Cudjoewood, or Jaquinia pungens shrub is blooming!

Jacquinia pungens commonly called Cudjoewood was once placed in the Theophrastaceae family, however that family is no longer recognized in recent classifications. Theophrastaceae has been placed within the enlarged Primulaceae family.

Cudjoewood is an evergreen, understory shrub found in the tropical, deciduous forests of southern Mexico. This shrub can reach a height of 3 meters. The reddish-orange, mildly fragrant flowers bloom in early spring (Feb-Mar).

The Tucker Greenhouse Jacquinia pungens shrub can be found in the desert room in the middle bed.

reddish-orange flower

Jacquinia pungens or Cudjoewood

Jacquiniapungens2

Check out these Tucker Greenhouse photos by a ‘budding’ young photographer

All photos below were taken by Alecia Ballew (a young, and very creative photographer) while she explored the Tucker Greenhouse on a recent afternoon in Feb.

red leafed plant

Velvety leaves of Solenostemon sp. (Coleus plant) found in the Lamiaceae family.

Beautiful red bracts and cyathium inflorescence of Euphorbia pulcherrima or Poinsettia plant found in the Euphorbiaceae family.

Beautiful red bracts and cyathium inflorescence of Euphorbia pulcherrima or Poinsettia plant found in the Euphorbiaceae family.

green aquatic plant

Eichhornia crassipes or Water Hyacinth found in the Pontederiaceae family

Jatropha japonica found in the Euphorbiaceae family

Jatropha japonica found in the Euphorbiaceae family

green leaf with water on it

Water on a Pothos sp. leaf found in the Araceae family

mask plant leaf

Water on an Alocasia amazonica (African mask plant) leaf found in the Araceae family

succulent plant

Haworthia reinwardtii found in the Xanthorrhoeaceae family

This is how we open the vents in the old Tucker Greenhouse

This is how we open the vents in the old Tucker Greenhouse

Roots coming up through the brick walkway in the desert room

Roots coming up through the brick walkway in the desert room

Brick walkway in the tropical room

Brick walkway in the tropical room

Rusty old cabinet in the main hallway

Rusty old cabinet in the main hallway

Desert room cacti collection

Desert room cacti collection

Tropical room right after being watered

Tropical room right after being watered

another view of the brick floor in the desert room

Another view of the brick floor in the desert room

North greenhouse and very old grow lights

North greenhouse and very old grow lights

Main hallway in the Tucker Greenhouse

Main hallway in the Tucker Greenhouse

 

Excavation has begun!

In the spring of 2014, a City of Columbia garbage truck parked on the north side of the Tucker greenhouse had a leak in its brake line.  When the brake line finally broke, it sprayed hot hydraulic fluid all over the north flower bed, saturating the soil and completely covering the vegetation on two existing trees, an Eastern Red Cedar (Juniperous virginiana) and a Buckthorn (Rhamnus cathartica).

The City of Columbia paid to have Campus Grounds Crew cut down the two dead trees, and remove all contaminated soil.  The ground crew will bring in brand new ‘glade-like’ soil, a well drained mix.  They’ll also replace all large rocks (in an artistic manner), and we will then fill this bed with native Missouri woodland and glade plants, and perhaps even a native shrub or tree too. Stay tuned, as this is a work in progress!

Tucker Greenhouse north tower bed.

Tucker Greenhouse north flower bed.

Rock removal

Rock removal was very tricky so close to the greenhouse glass.

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All trees and soil removed successfully!

All trees and soil removed successfully!

2:10:15#8

 

 

 

 

Ginger Lily

Alpina speciosa or ginger lily, is found in the Zingiberaceae family. This partuclar plant is found growing in the tropical greenhouse (the fish pond room). It is located at the end of the dock toward the west side of the greenhouse. The genus name comes from Prospero Alpini, an Italian botanist from the 17th century. This particular species of ginger is native to Asia, Australia and the Pacific Islands.

I pulled a flower off of a blooming inflorescence in the tropical room and decided to dissect it and photograph it.  See the photos below and their descriptions.

yellow flower

Alpinia speciosa or ginger lily found in the Zingiberaceae family.  Note two stamens surrounding a stigma in the middle.  Note the bright, colorful, orange nectar guides which alert pollinators to the nectar located inside of the flower.

white flowers

Ginger lily flower with petals (tepals) removed

Tepal with nectar guides on the left and two stamens on the right

Tepal on the left with nectar guides and two stamens on the right

orange flower

Longitudinal section of a dissected, inferior ovary at the top, and stamens below.  If you look very closely at the dissected ovary, the half section on the left still has the style attached.  If you look closely at the base of the style you’ll see a yellow nectary.  These flowers are pollinated by large bees, and sometimes even bats.

male part of flower

Stamen with style protruding.  If you look closely at the stamen, you can see white pollen.

February blooms and other things

blue and white bloom

Neomerica gracilis (Iridaceae family)

red flower

Jaquinia pungens (Theophrastaceae family)

pink flower

Cactaceae family-desert room

Cactaceae family-desert room

Cactaceae family-desert room

red flower

Primula sp. (Primulaceae family)

Veltheima capensis (Asparagaceae family)

Veltheima capensis (Asparagaceae family)

pink flower

Euphorbia millii (Euphorbiaceae family)

white flower

Spathe & Spadix inflorescence from a Taro root plant (Araceae family). Note the unopened male flowers above, and the unopened female flowers below.

white flower

Eucharis grandiflora (Amaryllidaceae family)

blue and white flower

Neomerica gracilis (Iridaceae family)

blue and white flower

Neomerica gracilis

desert plant

Agave sp. (Agavaceae family)

succulent plant

Crassulaceae family